Toronto International Film Festival. (TiFF)

Toronto International Film Festival.  (TiFF)

The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF, often stylized as tiff.) is one of the largest publicly attended film festivals in the world, attracting over 480,000 people annually. Since its founding in 1976, TIFF has grown to become a permanent destination for film culture operating out of the TIFF Bell Lightbox, located in downtown Toronto.
Year-round, the TIFF Bell Lightbox offers screenings, lectures, discussions, festivals, workshops, industry support, and the chance to meet filmmakers from Canada and around the world. TIFF Bell Lightbox is located on the north west corner of King Street and John Street in downtown Toronto.
In 2016, 397 films from 83 countries were screened at 28 screens in downtown Toronto venues, welcoming an estimated 480,000 attendees, over 5,000 of whom were industry professionals TIFF starts the Thursday night after Labour Day (the first Monday in September in Canada) and lasts for eleven days.
Founded in 1976, TIFF is now one of the largest and most prestigious events of its kind in the world In 1998, Variety magazine acknowledged that TIFF “is second only to Cannes in terms of high-profile pics, stars, and market activity”. In 2007, Time noted that TIFF had “grown from its place as the most influential fall film festival to the most influential film festival, period” This is partially the result of the festival’s ability and reputation for generating “Oscar buzz”.

Location Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Founded 1976
No. of films Fewest, 85 (1978); most, 460 (1984)
Language International
Website tiff.net

The festival was founded in 1976 at the Windsor Arms Hotel by Bill Marshall, Henk Van der Kolk and Dusty Cohl Beginning as a collection of the best-regarded films from film festivals around the world, it had an inaugural attendance of 35,000 Ironically, however, Hollywood studios withdrew their submissions from TIFF due to concerns that Toronto audiences would be too parochial for their productsIn the years following, TIFF continued to concentrate on bringing the best films from around the world Through consistent investment and promotion by its organisers and sponsors, the Toronto International Film Festival has also grown to become a vital component of Hollywood’s marketing machine. 
In 1994, the decision was made to replace the name “Festival of Festivals” with “Toronto International Film Festival”. From 1994 to 2009, the umbrella organization running TIFF was named “Toronto International Film Festival Group” (TIFFG). In 2009, the umbrella organization TIFFG was renamed to TIFF. 
In 2001, Perspective Canada, the programme that had focused on Canadian films since 1984, was replaced by two programmes:
• Canada First!, a forum for Canadian filmmakers presenting their first feature-length work, featuring eight to 15 films, and
• Short Cuts Canada, which includes 30-40 Canadian short films.
In 2004, TIFF was featured as the site of murder mystery in the film Jiminy Glick in Lalawood, a comedy film starring Martin Short.
In 2007, it was announced that the organization generates an estimated annual impact of $67 million CAD. By 2011, that benefit had grown to $170 million CAD.

Yassin Essamaoui

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